Is It Possible to Quench Thirst Using Barley Enriched Licorice Bread during Islamic Fasting?

Document Type: Research Paper

Authors

1 Ph.D in Food Engineering Post-doc in Nutrition Department of Food Science and Technology, Neyshabur University of Medical Sciences, Neyshabur, Iran/ Department of Nutrition, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran

2 Department of Nutrition, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran

3 Department of Community Medicine, School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran

4 Pharmacological Research Center of Medicinal Plants, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran

5 School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Mashhad, Iran

6 Department of Nutrition, School of Medicine, Biochemistry and Nutrition, Endoscopic & Minimally Invasive Surgery, and Cancer Research Centers, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences (MUMS), Paradise Daneshgah, Azadi Square, Mashad, Iran

Abstract

Introduction: Thirst is one of the main complaints during Islamic fasting. As bread is the staple food among most Muslims, evaluating its impact on thirst is important. In this study, we investigated the effect of licorice-enriched barley bread compared to barley bread and white wheat bread. Methods: This clinical trial was performed on three consecutive days during Itikaf ceremony. Data were garnered by using a checklist including items on demographic data, weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure, and pulse rate. Blood pressure and pulse rate measurements were repeated at the end of the study. The participants were divided into three groups receiving functional barley bread enriched with licorice, barley bread, and white wheat bread. The thirst sensation was assessed by Fan visual analogue scale. Also, 24-hour dietary recall was obtained on all the three days. Results: Overall, 273 people participated in this study. Thirst sensation in the functional barley bread was lower than that in the wheat bread and barley bread groups, but there were no significant differences between wheat and barley bread groups in this regard. During the fasting period, the greatest increase in thirst was observed during the first five hours of fasting in all the three groups, which was significantly lower in the functional barley bread group than the wheat and barley bread groups; however, there was no significant difference between wheat and barley bread groups in this respect. Finally, similar results were attained following fluid intake adjustment.Conclusion: This study showed that licorice enrichment of barley bread might alleviate thirst sensation among fasting individuals.

Keywords


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